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Digital Education Resource Archive (DERA): Using DERA

Finding material in DERA

 

image of laptop

There are a variety of ways to locate resources in DERA. You will not need to sign-in or register to access documents.

Finding DERA items using UCL Explore

UCL Explore is a discovery tool that allows you to search multiple resources simultaneously and relevant DERA results will automatically appear in your search results.

If you wish to limit your search to DERA items simply select Digital Education Resource Archive (DERA) from the drop-down Resources menu prior to beginning your search:

 

UCL Explore homepage. DERA option in the drop down menu.  

Finding DERA items via search engines

Digital items stored in DERA can be accessed directly from search engines. 

If you see a DERA item in your results page you can click directly through to the document without having to navigate the interface.

Tip! In most major search engines you can customise your results so that you only search the DERA repository. Simply type in your search term and add 'site:dera.ioe.ac.uk'.

Google homepage.

Using the DERA search interface

In many cases, a simple search will be enough to retrieve relevant resources.

However, you can also tailor your query using the advanced search page. It is possible to search by title, author, corporate author, name of series or year of publication. In addition, you can specify a search within the full texts - enabling you to discover a wider range of potentially useful material.

 

DERA search page

Search DERA

 

Browsing DERA

With DERA you also have the option to browse the resources by organisation or year of publication.

 

Browsing options on DERA homepage.

Referencing DERA resources

Regardless of the citation style you need to use, the following elements should be included whenever possible:

  • Author (this can be an individual or an organisation);
  • Year of publication.
  • Title.
  • Place of publication.
  • Publisher.
  • URL.
  • Access date.

Example:

Department for Education (2013). 3D printers in schools: uses in the curriculum: enriching the teaching of STEM and design subjects. Department for Education. Available at: http://dera.ioe.ac.uk/19468 (Accessed 15 July 2018).